Fall 2020 Graduate Courses

Healthcare Innovation graduate courses

Graduate courses act as Honors credit, as long as you earn a grade of B- or higher

Honors students are invited to take one or more courses in Healthcare Innovation on a space-available basis. Courses must be taken in sequence:

  • NURS 5111: Healthcare Innovation Theory and Application (Spring)
  • NURS 5112: Healthcare Opportunities for System Level Solutions (Fall)
  • NURS 5113: Developing & Leading a Sustainable Culture of Healthcare Innovation (Spring)
  • NURS 5114: Healthcare Innovation Development (Fall)

Contact Dr. Tiffany Kelley to discuss your interest in and fitness for these courses. The sequence is not recommended for first-year students.

ANSC 5618: Probiotics and Prebiotics

Graduate courses act as Honors credit, as long as you earn a grade of B- or higher.

Instructor: Mary Anne Amalaradjou

Recommended preparation: MCB 2610 (can be taken concurrently) or equivalent background in microbiology.

Interested to learn more about probiotics/prebiotics and how they are good for your health?

This course will provide an overview on probiotics, prebiotics and the microbiome, their biology health benefits and applications in human and animal health Commercially available probiotic and prebiotic supplements and functional foods will also be discussed.

Note: ANSC 5618 is cross-listed with ANSC 3318. Enroll in the graduate course in order to earn Honors credit.

PSYC 5614: Personnel Psychology

Graduate courses act as Honors credit, as long as you earn a grade of B- or higher.

Instructor:  Janet Barnes-Farrell

Open to psychological sciences majors in their senior year.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2600 (with final grade of A or A-) and instructor consent. If you are currently taking PSYC 2600, permission will be granted contingent on providing the instructor with confirmation of your final grade.

Methods and techniques of personnel psychology.  Topics addressed include job analysis, recruitment, selection and hiring, training and development, performance evaluation, and related areas.

PSYC 5285: Neurobiology of Aging: Changes in Cognitive Processes

Graduate courses act as Honors credit, as long as you earn a grade of B- or higher. 

Instructor: Etan Markus

Recommended for clinical, developmental, and neuroscience graduate students, as well as upper level undergraduates.

Instructor permission required.

Aging is an important topic of research due to its political, economic and social implications, and the fact that we all will (hopefully) personally experience this stage in the lifespan. We will examine aging at the neurobiological, personal, and family levels. Human data will be presented together with animal models of specific age-related deficits. This will be followed by a presentation of the neurobiological changes found during aging. Finally, the relationship between the behavioral and neurobiological findings will be examined. The emphasis will be on the normal aging process, although some age-related pathologies will also be examined.

Topics include:

  • What is aging? Must we age?
  • Evolution and models of biological aging.
  • Changes in the brain: Brain imaging, EEG, neurons, dendrites & synapses
  • Changes in motor ability and perception
  • Age-related changes in complex cognitive & adaptive functioning
  • Animal models of aging
  • Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease
  • Normal vs. pathological aging

Format: Lectures, class discussion and student presentations.

PSYC 5140: Foundations in Neuropsychology

Graduate courses act as Honors credit, as long as you earn a grade of B- or higher. 

Instructors: John Salamone & Deborah Fein

Recommended preparation: Some background in biology and/or neuroscience

An introduction to neuropsychology, including functional neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, neuropharmacology and cognitive/emotional function and dysfunction.