Author: Jaclyn Chancey

ENGL 1007: Seminar and Studio in Writing and Multimodal Composition

[UConn Storrs]

Honors ENGL 1007 recognizes that Honors students are often expected to write more and differently than other UConn students. There are additional opportunities for connection to your own major(s) and greater emphasis on the roles of inquiry and discovery in the humanities. Finally, the Honors sections will culminate with a public celebration of student work.

Two sections of Honors ENGL 1007 will be offered in Fall 2024, each with its own focus:

ENGL 1007-001 (MW 10:10 AM – 12:05 PM)

During this course, we will consider the ways in which people use stories to think through complex moral problems. We will examine a variety of texts (short stories, academic articles, podcasts, videos, songs, etc.) in order to better understand how and why they tell stories about complex moral issues. We will also analyze the ways in which storytelling can shape audiences’ perceptions of moral issues. In particular, your compositions will respond to and shape responses to inquiries such as these:

    • What is morality? What are moral dilemmas? How are these terms defined by different people and in different contexts?
    • How do people use stories to think through complex moral problems? What are the goals of these stories? What are these stories supposed to produce? In other words, what do they do (for individuals, institutions, societies, etc.)?
    • How are people defined by stories—the stories they tell, the stories they consume, and the stories that are told about them? What are the real-world effects of this? What is at stake?
    • In what ways can your own writing and compositions transform conversations around moral dilemmas and moral issues more broadly? How can diverse kinds of writing and storytelling provide new opportunities for learning and engagement between writer and audience?

While we are working on a common class inquiry, you will develop your own lines of questioning and thought as you investigate moral issues and stories that are important to you. To develop your line of thought, you will look for patterns in your own work and in others’ experiences, follow your own hunches, make your own connections, and define your own terms. This line of thought will develop across many forms, culminating in a presentation in which you put forward your own ideas. Assignments will include, for example: an infographic, discussion board posts, short essays, and a presentation.

ENGL 1007-008 (TTh 3:30 PM – 5:25 PM)

During this course, we will explore a question with no right answer: “What matters in the media we consume?” We’ll consider this inquiry from two angles: what we look for/value in our media, and what ethical responsibility we owe to others. These may seem unrelated, but nothing we do happens in a vacuum. The things we consume and create become one part of how we view the world, in both positive and negative ways. We will consider our context as members of a global society, and how our personal and social values – and biases – intersect with our media consumption.

As we work through individual responses to the class inquiry, our collective goal is not to discover a “correct” answer, but to explore a range of possibilities based on our individual perspectives & interests. To develop your personalized questions, you’ll look for, follow your own hunches, make your own connections, and define your own terms. You’ll explore your questions across many genres and modes, creating projects as individual and unique as each member of our class. In this course we will work on:

    • Developing personal narratives about your own media engagement and its intersection with our ethical responsibilities as members of a global society
    • Curating a media museum that provide context for your personal narrative
    • Reframing your narratives and media collections using critical texts from class
    • Creating your own questions and postulating your own responses
    • Developing unique intellectual projects that matter.

What does media consumption mean?
I’m using “consumption” as a catch-all term for the way we “take in” the work of others: reading, watching, listening, viewing, etc. We’ll define “media” as: anything created for public consumption, whether for the banana entire world or followers on a private account. I encourage you to interpret media broadly, to work through our inquiry by focusing on something you love, be that novels, short stories, plays, music, podcasts, tv shows, movies, video games, paintings or photographs, tiktok, instagram, youtube, tweets, etc.

SOCI 2275: Social Well-Being (Conversion Opportunity)

Online (asynchronous) during Summer 2

Instructor: Bradley Wright

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Wright welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students.

This class is one of the most popular electives on campus. In it, students learn how to maximize their own sense of well-being and how society impacts it. During summer, it’s offered as an online asynchronous class.

ENGL 2701-002: Creative Writing I

[UConn Storrs]

Instructor: Sean Forbes

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007, 1010, 1011, or 2011

Finding Your Artistic Voice Through Creative Writing Prompts

In this introduction to creative writing class we will examine the different approaches that a writer can take when trying to establish a speaker in a narrative poem or short story. The first half of the course will be dedicated to writing narrative poetry and for the second half we will focus on short and long form fiction stories. We will look at exemplary works of poetry and fiction from writers like David Dominguez, Allison Joseph, Richard Blanco, and fiction stories from One Story and One Teen Story, print literary journals that publish only one story per month. Students will produce a final portfolio of their original work. Class participation is an essential component to this largely workshop-based course along with weekly writing prompts such as writing in iambic pentameter and challenging in class writing prose sketches.

EEB 3205E: Current Issues in Environmental Science

[UConn Storrs]

This class will take an interdisciplinary look at current issues in the field of environmental science. Organized into three sections, we will spend the semester developing an understanding of what environmental science is and the history of the field, learning about the ecological and evolutionary processes that are important to understand how environmental issues arise and their possible solutions, and thinking about ways forward to solve our growing environmental crisis. Class times will be spent discussing primary readings from varied perspectives, learning about the science of the organisms and resources that make up environments, and debating current hot-topic issues and methods for restoring our environment. This course is appropriate for students at all levels, with or without biology backgrounds.

UNIV 3995-002: The Science & Practice of Finding Life Purpose

[UConn Storrs]

Instructor: Bradley Wright

Research finds that people who have a clear sense of life purpose are happier, more satisfied, are healthier, have deeper relationships, and do better at work. They even live longer! This one-credit Honors exploration of finding purpose throughout life will consist of seven weeks in class and seven weeks of guided experiential learning.

For more about the UConn Life Purpose Lab, visit https://lifepurpose.lab.uconn.edu/. If you have questions about the course, email Prof. Wright at bradley.wright@uconn.edu.

DMD 3998-001: Diverse Perspectives in Digital Media and Design (Conversion Opportunity)

[UConn Storrs]

Instructor: Clarissa Ceglio

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Ceglio welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students. Recommended pre-requisites waived for Honors students.

To paraphrase James Baldwin, nothing can be changed until it is faced. This is certainly true of the inequities that have historically shaped digital media technologies, content, fields, and careers. This class interrogates how racism, sexism, classism, ageism, and other forms of oppression are perpetuated through digital media works, practices, and industries. We will, as the chief learning activity of this class, meet and talk with contemporary practitioners who are challenging and changing the status quo. For six of our class sessions, we will meet virtually and sometimes in-person with industry professionals, artists, and media scholars from film, game, design, cultural and other sectors so that we can learn how issues of equity manifest in their work, creative processes, and professions. Because these practitioners are also part of DMD’s Diverse Perspectives in Digital Media & Design: 2024 Speaker Series, students will also have the opportunity to participate as hosts in the series, learn how to professionalize their on-camera presence, and gain skill in preparing and moderating live Q&A sessions. Interactions with our guests will be supplemented by readings, in-class film screenings, and engagements with other media works. Over the course of the semester, we will reflect on how our own areas of practice can support greater equity, diversity, and inclusion in digital media and design. (To see what we do, you can access the past installments of the Diverse Perspectives in Digital Media & Design series here: https://dmd.uconn.edu/major/diverse-perspectives/)

For more information, or to receive a permission number, email Prof. Ceglio (clarissa.ceglio@uconn.edu).

DMD 3620/HIST 3104: Collaborating with Cultural Organizations II: Practice (Conversion Opportunity)

[UConn Storrs]

Instructor: Clarissa Ceglio

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Ceglio welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students. Recommended pre-requisites waived for Honors students.

Museums, archives, and other cultural organizations are spaces of digital media experimentation as they seek new ways to communicate ideas, make collections accessible, inspire learning, connect people, and build community. In this class we will undertake a project in partnership with a cultural organization. This will provide immersion in issues of contemporary practice while building collaborative competency in design thinking approaches.

For more information, or to receive a permission number, email Prof. Ceglio (clarissa.ceglio@uconn.edu).

DMD 3610/HIST 3103: Collaborating with Cultural Organizations I: Methods (Conversion Opportunity)

[UConn Storrs]

Instructor: Clarissa Ceglio

Open to sophomores or higher.

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Ceglio welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students. Alternatively, Honors students may enroll in the cross-listed graduate section (DMD 5998-010), which will entail additional advanced work. 

Museums, archives, and other nonprofit cultural organizations are mission-driven institutions with complex, sometimes fraught, histories. Today, many such organizations seek to explore new ways to communicate ideas, make collections accessible, inspire learning, connect people, and build community. In addition to learning about the histories, structures, and functions of mission-driven cultural organizations, we will explore methods of collaborating meaningfully and effectively with them and their communities. This will include consideration of the ways in which digital media, from apps to virtual reality (VR), are being used to critically engage publics in questions about the past, present, and future. We will explore, too, the histories and responsibilities of cultural organization with regard to social justice, activism, and inclusivity.

For more information, email Prof. Ceglio.

DMD 3610/HIST 3103: Collaborating with Cultural Organizations I: Methods (Conversion Opportunity)

[UConn Storrs]

Instructor: Clarissa Ceglio

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Ceglio welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students. Alternatively, Honors students may enroll in the cross-listed graduate section (DMD 5998-010), which will entail additional advanced work. 

Museums, archives, and other nonprofit cultural organizations are mission-driven institutions with complex, sometimes fraught, histories. Today, many such organizations seek to explore new ways to communicate ideas, make collections accessible, inspire learning, connect people, and build community. In addition to learning about the histories, structures, and functions of mission-driven cultural organizations, we will explore methods of collaborating meaningfully and effectively with them and their communities. This will include consideration of the ways in which digital media, from apps to virtual reality (VR), are being used to critically engage publics in questions about the past, present, and future. We will explore, too, the histories and responsibilities of cultural organization with regard to social justice, activism, and inclusivity.
This learning will be applied to research and creation of a podcast series for the Benton Museum of Art’s upcoming exhibition Seeing Climate Change.

For more information, or to receive a permission number, email Prof. Ceglio.

EPSY 1450W: Mind, Body, Health (Conversion Opportunity)

Online (asynchronous) during Summer 1 and Summer 2

Instructor: Melissa Bray

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Bray welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students.

The role of the mind and its effects on subjective wellbeing (e.g., happiness, stress, depression, anxiety) and the physical body will be explored during this course. The past history and current literature supporting the mind body connection, assessment, and intervention will be presented. Implications for understanding mind body health relative to quality of life will be emphasized.

Experience treatments that alleviate stress, anxiety, depression, and improve happiness as well as attention! This class will introduce you to and allow you to try out experientials such as video self-modeling, virtual reality, self-monitoring, yoga, diet/nutrition, physical activity/exercise, nature/eco health, standard muscle relaxation, relaxation and guided imagery, deep breathing, written emotional expression, gratitude writing, mindfulness, meditation, and yoga.

A glimpse into the experiential portion of the course. 
More information about the instructor and the Mind-Body Health Research Interest Group.

CA 2, W.