Author: Jaclyn Chancey

UNIV 3995-002: The Science & Practice of Finding Life Purpose

[UConn Storrs]

Instructor: Bradley Wright

Research finds that people who have a clear sense of life purpose are happier, more satisfied, are healthier, have deeper relationships, and do better at work. They even live longer! This one-credit Honors exploration of finding purpose throughout life will consist of seven weeks in class and seven weeks of guided experiential learning.

For more about the UConn Life Purpose Lab, visit https://lifepurpose.lab.uconn.edu/. If you have questions about the course, email Prof. Wright at bradley.wright@uconn.edu.

DMD 3998-001: Diverse Perspectives in Digital Media and Design (Conversion Opportunity)

[UConn Storrs]

Instructor: Clarissa Ceglio

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Ceglio welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students. Recommended pre-requisites waived for Honors students.

To paraphrase James Baldwin, nothing can be changed until it is faced. This is certainly true of the inequities that have historically shaped digital media technologies, content, fields, and careers. This class interrogates how racism, sexism, classism, ageism, and other forms of oppression are perpetuated through digital media works, practices, and industries. We will, as the chief learning activity of this class, meet and talk with contemporary practitioners who are challenging and changing the status quo. For six of our class sessions, we will meet virtually and sometimes in-person with industry professionals, artists, and media scholars from film, game, design, cultural and other sectors so that we can learn how issues of equity manifest in their work, creative processes, and professions. Because these practitioners are also part of DMD’s Diverse Perspectives in Digital Media & Design: 2024 Speaker Series, students will also have the opportunity to participate as hosts in the series, learn how to professionalize their on-camera presence, and gain skill in preparing and moderating live Q&A sessions. Interactions with our guests will be supplemented by readings, in-class film screenings, and engagements with other media works. Over the course of the semester, we will reflect on how our own areas of practice can support greater equity, diversity, and inclusion in digital media and design. (To see what we do, you can access the past installments of the Diverse Perspectives in Digital Media & Design series here: https://dmd.uconn.edu/major/diverse-perspectives/)

For more information, or to receive a permission number, email Prof. Ceglio (clarissa.ceglio@uconn.edu).

DMD 3620/HIST 3104: Collaborating with Cultural Organizations II: Practice (Conversion Opportunity)

[UConn Storrs]

Instructor: Clarissa Ceglio

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Ceglio welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students. Recommended pre-requisites waived for Honors students.

Museums, archives, and other cultural organizations are spaces of digital media experimentation as they seek new ways to communicate ideas, make collections accessible, inspire learning, connect people, and build community. In this class we will undertake a project in partnership with a cultural organization. This will provide immersion in issues of contemporary practice while building collaborative competency in design thinking approaches.

For more information, or to receive a permission number, email Prof. Ceglio (clarissa.ceglio@uconn.edu).

DMD 3610/HIST 3103: Collaborating with Cultural Organizations I: Methods (Conversion Opportunity)

[UConn Storrs]

Instructor: Clarissa Ceglio

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Ceglio welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students. Alternatively, Honors students may enroll in the cross-listed graduate section (DMD 5998-010), which will entail additional advanced work. 

Museums, archives, and other nonprofit cultural organizations are mission-driven institutions with complex, sometimes fraught, histories. Today, many such organizations seek to explore new ways to communicate ideas, make collections accessible, inspire learning, connect people, and build community. In addition to learning about the histories, structures, and functions of mission-driven cultural organizations, we will explore methods of collaborating meaningfully and effectively with them and their communities. This will include consideration of the ways in which digital media, from apps to virtual reality (VR), are being used to critically engage publics in questions about the past, present, and future. We will explore, too, the histories and responsibilities of cultural organization with regard to social justice, activism, and inclusivity.
This learning will be applied to research and creation of a podcast series for the Benton Museum of Art’s upcoming exhibition Seeing Climate Change.

For more information, or to receive a permission number, email Prof. Ceglio.

EPSY 1450W: Mind, Body, Health (Conversion Opportunity)

Online during Summer I and Summer II

Instructor: Melissa Bray

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Bray welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students.

The role of the mind and its effects on subjective wellbeing (e.g., happiness, stress, depression, anxiety) and the physical body will be explored during this course. The past history and current literature supporting the mind body connection, assessment, and intervention will be presented. Implications for understanding mind body health relative to quality of life will be emphasized.

Experience treatments that alleviate stress, anxiety, depression, and improve happiness as well as attention! This class will introduce you to and allow you to try out experientials such as video self-modeling, virtual reality, self-monitoring, yoga, diet/nutrition, physical activity/exercise, nature/eco health, standard muscle relaxation, relaxation and guided imagery, deep breathing, written emotional expression, gratitude writing, mindfulness, meditation, and yoga.

A glimpse into the experiential portion of the course. 
More information about the instructor and the Mind-Body Health Research Interest Group.

CA 2, W.

EPSY 1830: Critical and Creative Thinking in the Movies (Conversion Opportunity)

Online during Summer I and Summer II

Instructor: James Kaufman

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Kaufman welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students.

In this course students will learn about such topics as logical fallacies, memory errors, problem solving, genius, and the creative personality through films, short readings, and discussions. Past featured films include: 12 Angry Men, Get Out, Memento, The Manchurian Candidate (1962), Run Lola Run, Lone Star, The Secret in their Eyes (2009), House of Games, Ex Machina, and Pan’s Labyrinth.

CA 2.

Healthcare Innovation graduate courses

[UConn Storrs]

Graduate courses act as Honors credit, as long as you earn a grade of B- or higher

Honors students are invited to take one or more courses in Healthcare Innovation on a space-available basis. Courses must be taken in sequence:

  • NURS 5111: Healthcare Innovation Theory and Application (Fall 2023)
  • NURS 5112: Healthcare Opportunities for System Level Solutions
  • NURS 5113: Developing & Leading a Sustainable Culture of Healthcare Innovation (Fall 2023)
  • NURS 5114: Healthcare Innovation Development (Fall 2023)

Contact Dr. Tiffany Kelley to discuss your interest in and fitness for these courses. The sequence is not recommended for first-year students.

ENGL courses, Fall 2023

[UConn Storrs]

Please view the Fall 2023 English Course Descriptions for more details about any of these courses. All require first-year writing (ENGL 1007/1010/1011) as a prerequisite.

Honors courses

ENGL 1101W: Classical and Medieval Western Literature
CA 1, W

ENGL 2408W: Modern Drama
CA 1

ENGL 2701: Creative Writing

Other courses of interest

The following ENGL courses are not Honors courses. However, advisors feel that they may be particularly interesting to Honors students.

ENGL 2001: Introduction to Grant Proposal Writing

ENGL 3267W: Race and the Scientific Imagination
CA 1, CA 4

ENGL 3621: Literature and Other Disciplines
Law and Literature

 

PHIL 2410: Know Thyself

[UConn Storrs]

As thinking beings, we have rich inner lives. And we have unfettered access to these inner lives. Whatever we might imagine at any given moment, we know (without fail) that this is what we are currently imagining. It would be absurd for someone else to correct us. To respond to a sincere claim like “I am imagining a house on a meadow” with “No you are not” would be facetious. We have this kind of unfettered access to many of our internal and bodily states. When someone thinks they are in pain, are hungry, tired, or wanting something, it would be absurd to correct them (except in very particular circumstances). One has similarly unfettered access to some parts of one’s identity, like one’s sexual orientation, gender identity, or religious beliefs.

There are, hence, a great many things about ourselves that we know about us better than anyone else. But, by contrast, there are a great many things about ourselves that are very difficult for us to know and that other people might know better. These include our habits, implicit assumptions or prejudices, and character traits. It might take someone else to point out one of our habits for us to realize we have it, or a supervised exercise to uncover our biases. Indeed, we might think of ourselves as good, virtuous people until someone else points out our failings. In such cases, it is far from absurd for someone to correct our beliefs about ourselves.

We will examine the tension between the kind of self-knowledge for which our self-perception is our best guide and the kind of self-knowledge for which we might be best served by perceiving ourselves through others. What is the ‘inner sense’ that gives us unfettered access to imagination, sensation, desire, and identity? And what it is about habit, prejudice and character that hides them from this sense?

Trouble registering? This class has a catalog-level pre-requisite of one 1000-level PHIL course. We can override this pre-requisite. If you are an Honors student, you may register by emailing honors@uconn.edu and including (1) your name; (2) your 7-digit Student Admin number; (3) your registration “pick time”; (4) the course number and section (PHIL 2410-001); (5) the class number from Student Admin; and (6) confirmation that there are seats available in the course.

AFRA/SOCI 2510: Ethnicity and Race

[UConn Storrs]

Are “Emily” and “Greg” more employable than “Lakisha” and “Jamal”? Did the election of Obama mean the end of racism? Do White Supremacists have inter-racial friendships? How do we count multiracial people on the US Census? How can one provide empirically-based solutions to the problems of racial inequality, racial discrimination, and systemic racism? What kind of sociological concepts can help us interpret what data we collect and analyze? How does field of sociology intersect with, in ways that both align with and depart from, other fields, such as biology, economics, history, genomics, or political science? This honors course will answer these questions and more by providing a rigorous and interdisciplinary introduction, rather than individual disciplines in isolation, to the scholarship on race and ethnicity. This interdisciplinary focus will be bounded within the context of North America, with a focus on the attainment, application, and production of knowledge related to ethnicity and race.

The course will be a hybrid of lecture and discussion, with regular writing exercises, and culminating in each student’s independent research project.