Author: Korner, Kathryn

ANTH 3098-002: Anthropology of Jews and Jewishness (Conversion Option)

Instructor: Sarah Willen

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Willen welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students. 

What does it mean to be Jewish …
… in Cuba? … in Ethiopia? … in Turkey?
… if you’re an atheist? … LGBTQ? … a convert?

These are some of the questions we will explore in this course, which will tap into the rich anthropological scholarship on Jewish life and Jewish communities around the world.

No prior knowledge of Judaism is required. Prior coursework in anthropology or sociology is helpful but not required. Question? sarah.willen@uconn.edu

Pending approval, this course may count toward the major or minor in Judaic Studies and/or as an ethnographic course toward the major in Anthropology.

ANTH 3098-50: Anthropology and the Writer’s Craft (Conversion Option)

Instructor: Sarah Willen

While this is not an Honors course, Prof. Willen welcomes Honors students of all majors and would be happy to offer Honors conversions for interested students. 

In this seminar, we will dive deeply into classic and cutting-­‐edge anthropological writing – and try our own hand at various genres of writing, in workshop format. Together we will engage critically with the texts we read and reflect on the following questions:
• How, why, and for whom do anthropologists and other social scientists write?
• What genres and writing styles are available to anthropologists, and how do they differ?
• What distinguishes strong – and weak – writing?
• How can deep engagement as readers, and a serious commitment to the revision process, help us become better writers?

The seminar is geared primarily toward advanced undergraduates who want to explore the range of contemporary forms of writing – and become better and more effective writers themselves. Prior coursework in Anthropology is helpful but not necessary. Writing activities will include ethnographic sketches, book reviews, peer review of colleagues’ writing, and blog posts / op-­‐eds for public audiences.

Questions? sarah.willen@uconn.edu.

2018 Rowe Lecture

Ms. Alicia Ely Yamin is the Visiting Professor of Law at Georgetown Law and Program Director for the Health and Human Rights Initiative at the O’Neil Institute for National and Global Health Law. Her career focuses on the intersection of health and human rights, in both the academic world as well as in activism. She is known globally for her scholarship on and advocacy of right-based approaches to health. She contributed to the drafting of several General Comments by the UN treaty bodies, as well as UN Human Rights Council resolutions. She regularly advises the UN bodies related to health and human rights while providing guidance to NGOs on landmark litigation. She has served on WHO Task Forces and is currently a Commissioner on the Lancet Commission on Global Health and Law. Ms. Yamin was awarded the prestigious Joseph H. Flom Fellowship on Global Health and Human Rights from 2007 to 2011.

 

Ms. Yamin has written a book, Power, Suffering and the Struggle for Dignity: Human Rights Frameworks for Health and Why They Matter, which was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. This work is focused on defining what a human rights based approach to health and development means, and why it matters. Additionally, it provides a foundation for the understanding of how a human rights based approach implies the potential for social transformation.

2016 Distinguished Alumni Award: David Fetterman

Recognized as one of the leading scholars in American education, Dr. Fetterman is author to 16 books and hundreds of articles and chapters on the subject. The recommendations from his book, Excellence and Equality, led the U.S. Department of Education to formulate a panel to select a national center for the gifted and talented. As an appointed member, Dr. Fetterman recommended the University of Connecticut to the panel, granting the University a $10 million federal award for the National Research Center for the Gifted and Talented, now directed by Dr. Joseph Renzulli. Dr. Fetterman’s fields of expertise include evaluation, medical and teacher education, dropout programs, gifted and talented education, higher education, and distance learning. His empowerment evaluation method (a self-help approach) makes great contribution to the theory and practice of education–and according to the American Evaluation Association, remains “one of the greatest evaluation innovations of the past two decades.”